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    • CommentAuthorCrewcut
    • CommentTimeNov 30th 2014
     
    Sad, Sad News. I loved Maggie. I loved her even in grade school. In 7th grade, she was the first girl I ever danced with. Remember at the Friday Night Club, when they gave us all dance lessons, the girls all put their shoes in a big pile in the middle of the floor, and us guys went out and picked a shoe. The owner of the shoe was our first dance partner. I picked Maggie's shoe. So we struggled around out there for half an hour or so while the instructors tried to teach us what to do with our feet. As usual, Maggie was a good sport while I tried to figure it out. She was so warm and caring. The world won't be near as bright a place with her gone.
    • CommentAuthorCorey
    • CommentTimeMar 13th 2015
     
    I have sad news to report. As some of you may already have learned from Margie, we have lost another class member. Nicky Hutsko died suddenly at his home in Norfolk. Nicky posted as The Dead End Kid. He was a close friend of a lot of us and kept in touch over the years. He will be greatly missed.
    • CommentAuthorPonytail
    • CommentTimeMar 13th 2015
     
    Oh My God. This is so sad. What a great guy he was. Never a showoff or smart aleck or anything. And a really good dancer. Very quiet in class, but every once in a while he'd make some comment and he was always just hilarious. He'd whisper something to me across the aisle and I would have to put my hand over my mouth and squeeze really hard to keep from laughing out loud and he'd never even crack a smile. I remember he loved baseball. He would always come in the library and check the sports page to see the previous night's results.
    • CommentAuthorLugnut
    • CommentTimeMar 13th 2015
     
    Damn. I hate to hear this. Nicky was a good friend. I kept hoping he'd make it back for the reunions. He was one of those late blooming classmates who did a lot better after leaving Coraopolis than he did when he was in Coraopolis. I used to go over and sledride down Vine Street and of course Nicky's house was at the top of the hill, so it was a nice place to step in and get warm every 6-8 runs. I first met him in 7th grade, when we all came together for the first time. We both liked baseball and fishing and hiking, so we became friends, but I was a little jealous of him during junior high. He was so smooth with the girls. I couldn't even get up the nerve to ask anyone out. I had a hard enough time asking a girl to dance with me at the Friday Night Club. Meanwhile, Nicky was going out with the best looking girls in our class. He wasn't flashy or a star athlete or the best student or anything, and he never had any money, but they all loved him. 'Bye, Old Buddy.
    • CommentAuthorBobbySox
    • CommentTimeMar 14th 2015
     
    Noooo. Talk about ruining your day. Nicky was one of my all time favorite guys. As a matter of fact, in hindsight, he may have been my second all time favorite guy, behind only hubby here. Nicky and I dated for about half a year in junior high. He was a fantasy boyfriend to a girl at age 13 or 14. Most of the guys in junior high were still figuring out how to deal with girls. Dating was some kind of game to them. A guy asked a girl out because she was considered by all his guy friends to be one of the prettiest girls in school, or because she was a cheerleader, or for some other reason related to status. You felt like you were a trophy on display. Not with Nicky. He had all the little niceties down perfect, and then instead of spending the night talking about himself, he'd spend it asking you what you wanted to do, what you thought about this or that, how your week had been, etc. He also seemed so vulnerable, sort of sad and lonely, which touched a chord in all us girls. His problem was that he placed a huge importance on loyalty. He wanted a girl to call his own, a girl that was going out only with him. In junior high none of us girls were interested in that. We wanted to be able to date him plus other guys. Eventually this caused one girl after the next to break up with him. But looking back on it the truth is those other guys we were so insistent on dating weren't nearly as nice or as attentive as Nicky. Even after he and I broke up, I still liked him a lot, which I kept assuring him, and I tried to talk to him a few minutes each day all through high school. I think he always saw himself as an outsider. He lived way up on that hill on Vine Street, on the edge of town, a long way from the school, the Y, downtown, and all of us. I never got the impression he thought he belonged, either in junior high or high school. But I knew other girls who had also dated him : Lynette, Elaine, Margaret, etc., and they all really liked him as much as I did, except they weren't ready to be in an exclusive relationship. I was so glad to learn that he really found his special place in the Navy, a place where they made him feel valuable and appreciated. A lot of girls in our class who ended up making bad choices and having failed marriages would have been better off to have grabbed hold of Nicky. He was special.
    • CommentAuthorDago
    • CommentTimeMar 15th 2015
     
    Nicky and I weren't close. He didn't play sports, he didn't live near me, we didn't have many classes together, and we weren't in any of the same clubs. The only time we saw each other was in home room, where every year for some reason we always sat near each other. But we did have one thing in common : we both appreciated fine women. The big difference was, I was still pretty much of a klutz when it came to the dating scene. From 7th grade on, I was just constantly amazed at how he managed to date almost every good looking girl in town. He'd go out with a few of them two or three times, and then he'd settle on one for about a 3-4 month relationship, and then he'd move on to another one. I couldn't figure it out. He never had any money, he never had a car, he wasn't an athlete, he didn't come from one of the town's important families, he was never a snazzy dresser, he wasn't an honor student, he didn't live close to any of the girls, he didn't seem to me to be particularly good looking (not that I was exactly a movie star myself), but they all loved him. And they didn't just say yes when he asked them out. They'd come up to him in the hall, or stop by his desk, and start talking to him. Sometimes a girl from some other homeroom would come to our homeroom just to talk to him. Damndest thing I ever saw. At the sophisticated age of 15 or 16 this was a constant source of amazement to me. Since us guys back then were sort of obsessed with girls, and very few of us were having any success with them, it always seemed to me Nicky led a fantasy life. It was like he knew some magic secret that none of the rest of us knew, and neither he nor the girls were willing to tell us. But he was a good guy. He was always in a good mood, always congratulated me when our team won a game, always wished me good luck when we had a game coming up, and on Fridays would wish me a good weekend and on Mondays would ask if I had a good weekend. Like Lucy used to say all the time, there were a lot of people in our class she wished she had gotten to know better. I wish now I had gotten to know Nicky better. From what everyone says, he must have been a great guy.
  1.  
    I remember Nicky as a great fisherman. I didn't meet him til 7th grade, when the Lincoln School kids joined us in junior high. We sat together in some classes and worked on some homework together and started talking and found out we both liked to fish. So we'd go fishing together. He introduced me to that fishing spot where the Montour Creek emptied into the river. There was sort of a sand and stony apron extending out into the river where we could stand or haul a log down to and sit on. A lot of people fished there. Sometimes they'd catch a lot of fish --- mostly Catfish --- and some days nothing was biting. Nicky, however, never had those days when nothing was biting. He could always catch fish. And it was pretty comical, because some of the men in town would bring some fancy rods and reels and tackle boxes down there, and I had a nice rod myself which came from the hardware store. Nicky didn't even have a rod. He'd bring a spool of fishing line. I think he may have had the same spool of fishing line the whole time I knew him. So he'd take a penknife out of his pocket and climb up on the bank, and cut a willow shoot about seven feet long. Then, it would depend on what season it was. Sometimes he'd find a rock and use it as a shovel and dig a hole in the side of the bank and find a worm or a grub or something. He'd pull an old aspirin tin --- remember those things that held about six aspirin --- and open it up and take out this big wide circle hook. He'd rig the hook onto the line, tie the line to the end of the willow branch, push the hook through the bait, and he was ready to go. He always carried this real fine mesh net in his pocket. I don't know if it was actually a fishing net or something he got from one of his sisters. Sometimes he'd walk real slow and easy back along the shallows and look for minnows. If there was a school of them swimming in there, he'd cast down his net, let it settle to the bottom, then pull it in and have half a dozen minnows. If it was late August, he'd walk along the bank and cast the net in the weeds and catch him some grasshoppers. And in the Winter, there was this Giant Eagle Grocery at the bottom of Montour Street, and he'd go around to the back and ask if they were throwing out any cheese or fish. He'd get a paper bag of it and bring it with us, and use pieces of that for bait. So anyway, then he'd stand there and study the water for a while, then throw his line out. He didn't have any reel. He had this long line with a weight on the end of it which he'd throw by hand, underhand. We'd stand there for maybe five minutes, and then he'd start pulling in this big Catfish. These guys sitting in their folding chairs with their six packs and their tackle boxes and fancy rods and reels would be looking over at Nicky like he was from outer space. But he'd never take a fish home. "These things are death," he'd say. "This water's poison. Too full of chemicals." A lot of people back then would take the fish home and eat them, but Nicky was ahead of his time in knowing that wasn't safe. He was a good friend. I hope he got in a lot of fishing down there in Norfolk.
    • CommentAuthorLurk
    • CommentTimeMar 19th 2015
     
    I wonder if we all fully appreciate just what Nicky did. What he became. Several have mentioned he became an engineer. But it was more than that. He became a nuclear engineer. And even that wasn't all. He was THE engineer. He served on nuclear submarines. Nicky was the most important man on the entire sub. The pressure on him was enormous. If he made one mistake, the whole crew died. He and I had a lot in common so we kept in touch after he left Coraopolis. He talked all the time about how he was on call 24 - 7. When he was sleeping, assistants monitored the instrument panel. If one needle moved one notch to the left or right, they woke Nicky up. So from the time they left Norfolk til the time they returned, the pressure was continuous. And they weren't out there on a pleasure cruise. That was the 1960s. Remember those submarines we had hiding along the Russian coast monitoring the coming and going of Russian ships? That was Nicky down there in that sub. And then in Vietnam, those subs we had just offshore of the MeKong Delta, preventing any Chinese Communist ships from delivering supplies to the Viet Cong? That was Nicky down there in that sub. They had Russia and China continually trying to find them and drop depth charges to destroy them. They'd be deep underwater for weeks at a time. A man can't handle that kind of pressure for too long. He burns out. So after eight years they brought Nicky back to Norfolk and he worked in the shipyard there, supervising construction and training other nuclear engineers. We had a lot of classmates who rose to important positions and did well, but Nicky may have become one of the most important guys we produced.
    • CommentAuthorynottony
    • CommentTimeMar 23rd 2015
     
    When is the next get together scheduled? We keep losing people and that saddens me.
    • CommentAuthorIslander
    • CommentTimeApr 9th 2015
     
    I realize she was two years behind the class of 1960, but I saw Cookie Palladini's obituary in the Washington Post a couple of months ago. Her married name was Smith and the obit had a very nice picture of her. Since neither Neville nor Coraopolis High Schools no longer exist, school mates from that era should not be forgotten. If you get a chance, Google her obit.
    • CommentAuthorCrewcut
    • CommentTimeApr 19th 2015
     
    Getting back to Nicky, I always liked him. He might have been the only guy in our whole class with zero ego. When he told jokes, they were usually about some dumb or funny thing he had done. If somebody made some sarcastic comment about him, he's get that big grin on his face and look over and ask them if saying that made them feel better. If they said damn right it did, he's laugh and say, Well, glad I could make your day. Especially in junior high, guys were always getting up tight about some girl. Nicky would just shrug and say, hey, there's lots of good looking girls here. If that one doesn't appreciate you, move on to the next one. We had a lot of short tempered guys in our class, and down there in junior high they were always on the edge of getting into some confrontation with somebody. There's no telling how many fights and shouting matches Nicky defused with that calm manner of his and that low voice and his advice to just laugh it off or shrug it off or not let it get to you. He was one of the shorter guys in our class but down there in 7th and 8th grade a lot of the time it was like he was the adult in the room.
    • CommentAuthorLindsay
    • CommentTimeApr 19th 2015
     
    I just found out about Nicky. I haven't been checking this site every day lately and when I came back to it I saw the posts about him. This is so sad. I went out with Nicky several times. Not in a row. We'd go out a couple of times, then go about a year, then go out a couple of times, and so on, beginning in 7th grade and continuing all the way through high school graduation. He was a lot different from all the other guys. There was always a tension with guys, like they were trying to project some image, play some role, make an impression. Nicky wasn't into any of that. He was always just so relaxed, like he knew exactly who he was, and he was fine with that. But I always thought he should go to college and major in psychology. He just always had such insight into everyone's character. He had everybody in town figured out, and he was dead on correct. He was like an adult in a junior high boy's body. Looking back on it, he was another one of those guys us girls didn't fully appreciate at the time. He was a treasure. I hadn't seen Nicky in more than 50 years, but I have sort of a lump in my throat as I type this.
  2.  
    I never dated Nicky, although if he'd have asked me out I'd have been glad to. But we had classes together and I knew him pretty well. I liked him a lot. I think a major reason so many girls really liked him was he knew how to pay a compliment and he did it all the time, every day. A lot of guys never did it, and some of the ones who did acted embarrassed or awkward about it, and some of the ones who did were doing it in a sort of insulting, sarcastic way. Nicky knew how to pay a compliment. He was sincere, and he seemed to have the knack of picking out exactly the right thing to compiiment. He noticed things : a new sweater, new coat, whatever. Us girls used to talk all the time about how oblivious most of the guys were. They never noticed anything. A girl could have shown up bald, or with her hair green, or wearing a Boy Scout uniform, or literally anything, and then when some other girl asked them later if they noticed anything new or different about so and so, they'd shrug and say no they didn't think so. But Nicky noticed. And he'd mention it. The truth is, most of us girls were pretty insecure, especially down in junior high. I never heard anyone spell it out, but it was like we were all afraid of being anonymous. We wanted to be noticed, to be important, to have somebody care whether we showed up or not. So when we'd miss a few days of school and then ask the guy sitting behind us what we missed, and he blinked and said huh, weren't you here yesterday, we felt like slapping him. But Nicky would always nudge us on the way into the class and ask where we'd been and was everything OK and were we feeling OK. And he'd say, real low so only we could hear him, hey, I really like that sweater. Lemme tell you, he earned lots of Brownie points doing that. I think he could have dated any girl in town. I always hoped he would come back to a reunion so I could see who he married. I bet she was wonderful.
    • CommentAuthorNatalie
    • CommentTimeApr 21st 2015
     
    Geez. So many good people we're losing. Nicky, now, this is just terrible. How can it be that someone we haven't seen or had any contact with for 50 years can leave such a hole in our heart when we hear of his passing? Like a lot of girls in our class, I dated Nicky off and on all the way up the grades. I remember him as a good dancer, a good talker, so very polite and considerate, and so very insightful into what made everyone tick. No matter who you were dating at the time, when you had a major crisis in your life, when your dog died or you studied hard for a test and still failed it, when you didn't make cheerleader or the lead in a play or something that you tried out for, it was Nicky you wanted to talk to. A lot of teenage guys, even the ones we felt close to, felt romantically involved with, thought were really intelligent, just didn't have the empathy to comfort anyone. Nicky did. I remember a lot of times in junior high we'd sit on the bank across the street from the school, and in high school we'd sit on those steps alongside the school, and talk my way through some major disappointment or crisis. Hard to believe all us girls let him slip through our fingers. We should have known he'd end up becoming somebody special.

    Can we just all go back and do this over again? So much we took for granted. So many people not appreciated. So many opportunities not taken advantage of. I think I'll just cry now.
    • CommentAuthorCorey
    • CommentTimeOct 21st 2015
     
    I have more bad news. Marge has just notified me we have lost Linda Dicicco Swinkola, who died Tuesday. There will be no visitation, but a memorial service is being planned at Copeland Funeral Home.
    • CommentAuthorPonytail
    • CommentTimeOct 22nd 2015
     
    Oh, No. This is really getting depressing. We're losing way too many classmates. Linda was always so sweet. I always felt Linda was somewhat intimidated by our class. We were a bunch of outgoing, talkative, active, loud, intense characters. She wasn't exactly shy, but she couldn't get a word in edgewise. It wasn't in her nature to shout, and she couldn't get her voice heard above the noise. She was intelligent, hard working and responsible, but in a class where girls were going on to get masters and doctorate degrees it was hard to stand out in the classroom, and on teams where girls were going on to play in college, it was hard to stand out athletically.
    • CommentAuthorNatalie
    • CommentTimeOct 22nd 2015
     
    That is so sad. She was a dear. I always envied her living right across the street from the high school. Especially in bad weather it must have been incredible to just walk out the side door and down the steps and cross the street to her front door. All my life I've remembered her as having the most beautiful handwriting of anyone I've ever known. Today I guess that doesn't mean much, since my grandkids say they don't even teach cursive writing anymore. But in our day it was still important and hers was the best. Shorthand was also a key skill back in our day and Linda was the best shorthand student in the whole high school.
    • CommentAuthorLindsay
    • CommentTimeOct 22nd 2015 edited
     
    Awwww. I sure hate to hear this. I considered her a real friend. Whenever I think of her, I always think of Elizabeth Reinhart. Mrs. Reinhart was the little German woman (she had been born and raised in Germany and still spoke English with a heavy German accent) who lived next door to Linda. Elizabeth's own daughter was several years ahead of us, and was already graduated and married by the time we came along. So Mrs. Reinhart sort of adopted Linda as her honorary daughter and was always fussing over her and buying her things and mentoring her. When Linda would be disappointed in something Mrs. Reinhart would be the one to cheer her up. When Linda would make an A or win some award she'd come home and step next door --- their front porches almost touched --- and let Mrs. Reinhart know. Mrs. Reinhart was also always trying to fix Linda up with other guys in our class. She was friends with lots of families at church and at the Y and in several women's clubs. She was convinced Linda was a real treasure --- which she was --- and was always trying to convince other mothers to convince their sons of this. Unfortunately, most of the guys already had other girls and weren't interested.
    • CommentAuthorLugnut
    • CommentTimeOct 22nd 2015
     
    Hmmm. Another loss. I never dated Linda but I always liked her and we talked a lot. I hadn't seen her in years so all my information was coming second and third hand, but if I understood correctly, she had sort of a rough life. I think she spent the last part of it in a wheelchair. If I'm wrong about this somebody please correct me. The thing about her back in junior and senior high school was that even though she wasn't a star athlete or student or anything, she was really smart and saw everything and was very wise. She gave me lots of advice which turned out to be very good. Some of it I took seriously and it paid off. Some of it I ignored and it got me in trouble. I don't know why I never asked her out. She was cute and funny and would have been a fine girlfriend.
    • CommentAuthorBobbySox
    • CommentTimeOct 22nd 2015
     
    I have a lump in my throat. I considered her a real friend all the way through school. I always thought she was special but even when we were kids I thought she was in the wrong school. She dreamed of going to Lincoln Elementary School but the dividing line missed her by like two houses. They even requested an exception but the board denied it. So she had to go to Central. We all liked her, but Central was a big school, and I think Linda would have done better in a small school like Lincoln. Then we all came together in 7th grade and junior high was so big and busy. I always thought Linda would have done better in a small school like maybe Neville. She talked seriously about going to OLSH for high school, but she wanted to take a lot of business courses and OLSH didn't offer them. So she stayed with us at Cory. She did fine, always made good grades and had lots of friends. But as Ponytail mentioned, Linda would have been outstanding at most other schools but in our class it was hard to rise to the top. Even if she'd been a year older or younger, it would have been easier. I regret that we lost touch after high school. She was a good friend. I kept intending to look her up but now I've waited too long.
    • CommentAuthorDago
    • CommentTimeOct 23rd 2015
     
    Sad. I agree with what the others have said. We all knew each other, not just through school, but through church and other activities around town. From an early age, Linda was always short. Maybe it was because of that, but us guys all saw her as sort of our little sister. We felt protective in a way. We'd tease all the other girls, except Janice, who would punch us, or Carol, who would freeze us with her icy glare. But we never teased Linda because she always seemed so vulnerable. When we started teasing the girls, Linda would never say anything, just get that hurt look on her face and go somewhere and sit down. So we quit. By eighth grade, it was like she was immune to sarcasm or ridicule. Since she never said anything sarcastic or mean about any of us, we had an unspoken understanding none of us would ever say anything to or about her. And if anyone had, the rest of us would have led him aside and told him to apologize and then shut up. So in her own quiet way, Linda established herself in our existence.
    • CommentAuthorBlondie
    • CommentTimeOct 26th 2015 edited
     
    This is really depressing news. Linda and I were buddies all the way through. She and I went to a movie just about once a week from early grade school through our senior year. We could leave her house, walk down the street half a block, cross the street at the church, walk that short block past the Presbyterian church, cross the street, walk one more block, and cross the street. Remember there were two theaters, the one across from the VFW and Hardware, the other across from the Police Station. The Fifth Avenue and the Coraopolis. The one across from the VFW was newer and played more movies we wanted to see, so we liked to go there. But then it closed, which at our young age was terribly traumatic. So then we had to go to the other one all the time. Sometimes there would be five or six of us go together, Harriet, Elaine, Sharon after she moved down there, but a lot of times it was just Linda and me. Through grade school and junior high we almost always went to the Saturday matinee. We got to see two movies plus previews, a cartoon and the Saturday Serial, which was either Superman, Batman or the Lone Ranger. I still remember we paid 25 cents to get in and would spend 5 cents for a Pepsi in a paper cup and 5 cents for popcorn. A lot of other kids also came to the Saturday Matinee, so it was like a big social get together. We'd keep moving around, sitting with different groups of kids. If the movie was really good, we watched it, but if it didn't hold our interest, we'd just talk, and once in a while the usher would come down and blink his flashlight snd tell us to be quiet. Linda just loved the movies. I treasure those memories. She was a dear friend.
    • CommentAuthorPeggy Sue
    • CommentTimeOct 27th 2015
     
    Awful News. We used to play together. My mother was good friends with Mrs. Reinhart, and every week or so Mom would take me down for an afternoon. She'd visit with Mrs. Reinhart while I played with Linda. That was such a neat little neighborhood. Being little, we weren't allowed to cross the street, so we were confined to the block Linda lived on. But what a block! An alley ran through it from one end to the other, and another alley cut across it right in the middle from 5th Avenue to 4th Avenue. Deramo's was on the alley. People would drive through from 4th Avenue to the alley, right through the big barn, buy their beverages, and load them up. Even on the hottest days, it was always so cool and dark inside that barn. Plus Mr. Deramo would give us a free Cream Soda. Van Balens Laundry was right there on the alley, and a lot of times one or two of the Van Balen kids would be there with their parents, and they'd play with us for an hour or so. The big church, of course, was at the other end of the alley, and we could sneak in and look around the empty church, which always felt spooky and mysterious with no one there. Sometimes Father Healy or one of the nuns would be in the church or in the courtyard and we'd get to talk to them about stuff. There was that big creek flowing out of the tunnel, way down in the ravine. We weren't supposed to, but we'd climb down and look for crawfish, salamanders, frogs and stuff. And we'd peek up into the tunnel and talk about how someday we were going to walk through to the other side, except we never did. Playing with Linda and exploring her neighborhood was a highlight of my growing up. I'm so sad to hear she's gone. I wish she had come to some of our reunions.
    • CommentAuthorLurk
    • CommentTimeOct 28th 2015
     
    I always liked Linda because she was a good dancer. She came to almost every dance, the Friday Night Club dances at the Y and then the Saturday Night Club dances which were sometimes at the Y and sometimes in the high school gym, right across the street from Linda's house. She was real short, so I'm sure we made a goofy looking pair out there dancing, but she was really a good dancer and I always asked her to dance several times each night. She could dance slow or fast and no matter what the song. One reason her loss is so sad is because I hadn't seen her since the day we graduated. I liked her a lot from 7th grade through 12th grade and then we just never saw each other again. I wish she and all these other people would come to our reunions so we wouldn't feel so empty when we lose them.
    • CommentAuthorCrewcut
    • CommentTimeOct 28th 2015
     
    A lot of these posts imply that Linda didn't have much of a sense of humor. I disagree. I always thought she had a great sense of humor. She loved to laugh at Dean Martin & Jerry Lewis, the Three Stooges, Lucy and the other comedians, sometimes on TV and sometimes down at the movies. I still remember the Lucy movie The Long Long Trailer, which had Lucy and Ricky taking this ridiculously long trailer on their honeymoon. It really was a hysterical movie, and we all laughed, but Linda laughed all the way through so hard I seriously thought she was going to hyperventilate and we were going to have to carry her outside to the fresh air. There was that one scene where Lucy was collecting rocks and kept hiding them in every drawer and compartment, and then as they towed the trailer up and down hills the rocks kept shifting and throwing the trailer off balance. Linda laughed so hard she had tears running down her face and she was collapsed almost all the way down to the floor and she had a hard time catching her breath. It got to where more people were watching Linda laugh than were watching the screen. So the idea she was this overserious little gnome is false. She laughed a lot and could say funny things. What she did not do, and the reason a lot of kids thought she had no sense of humor, was she didn't insult people. We were a strange class. Ever since kindergarten, we were a sarcastic, teasing, harassing bunch. Us guys flirted with girls by teasing and harassing them. The girls learned to respond with quick, clever retorts. So each day involved one sarcastic remark after another. Except for Linda. She made it clear from the start she wasn't going to participate in that. So she got the reputation for being an old grouch. But it was false. She just didn't like teasing and insulting people. She didn't like harassing anyone. But she was a sweetheart, and she was funny in her own way.
    • CommentAuthorDuckpin
    • CommentTimeOct 28th 2015
     
    I never saw any indication she had no sense of humor. She was short so I always referred to her as Midge, Mushroom or Short Stuff. She always referred to me as Beanpole, Stilt or Cornstalk and would ask me how the weather was up there. She was also quick to laugh, or at least smile and shake her head or snicker or make some sort of face when Nick, Danny, Bill or one of the others would start aggravating Lucy about her National Fussbutt Award or one of their other totally bogus scenarios.
    • CommentAuthorCorey
    • CommentTimeMay 2nd 2016
     
    Been kind of quiet on here for a while, but we have a reunion coming up in July. Who's coming?
    • CommentAuthorDago
    • CommentTimeMay 2nd 2016
     
    Wouldn't miss it for the world. The way things are going, we can't afford to miss one. We keep losing people. Every reunion, there's someone there that we'll never get a chance to talk to again.
    • CommentAuthorCrewcut
    • CommentTimeMay 4th 2016
     
    We'll be there. There are some people I haven't seen for a while and I sure would like to see them at this one : Janice, Tom Styles, Nick, Kitty Lou and Ruck in particular.
    • CommentAuthorLugnut
    • CommentTimeMay 8th 2016 edited
     
    We'll be there. I agree there are some people I'd love to see there but I get aggravated with some of our classmates. I'll see some of them downtown and ask them if they're coming and they'll give me a snotty answer. Two guys in particular that I see fairly often have never come to one even though they live right here in town. One says, "The same clique that ran everything when we were in school runs the reunions now. They didn't have any use for me back then so I don't have any use for them now." The other says, "The only people going to those things are the ones who made it big and want to get together snd brag about it to each other." Now, I don't try to argue with them right there on the sidewalk downtown. I'll just say, "Man, you have the wrong idea. We have a lot of fun. It's neat to see everyone." but what they say makes me mad. I'm sure not rich or famous and I always enjoy getting together with everybody. I honestly don't know anybody in our class who thinks they're better than anybody else, which is amazing, considering we have some people who really have done amazing things and have every right to think they're pretty hot stuff.
    • CommentAuthorBobbySox
    • CommentTimeMay 8th 2016
     
    I had to learn this the hard way. It broke my heart to learn it, and I refused to face it for a long time, but after trying with no success to talk several people into coming, I finally accepted it. Here it is : We don't all have the same good memories. We like to think that we were one big happy family and everything was warm and fuzzy all the time, but that wasn't true for everybody. There were some kids in our class who were struggling with big problems at home or in their personal lives. And there were some kids that none of us made any effort to include in our groups, so they really felt left out. I feel bad about that, and we didn't do it on purpose, but it's the truth.
  3.  
    As usual, Lucy was right. Go back through these posts and you'll find several places where she talks about this. She says she wishes she could go back in a time machine because she now realizes there were some kids sitting right there next to her who she never got involved with who were really neat and were into some fascinating stuff and she would like to have known about it and talked to them about it and maybe gone with them on a Saturday or some evening and watched them do some of that stuff. There was a lot of teasing and kidding around with Lucy, but she was pretty accurate in her judgements back then and for a long time as an adult. For example, she said one time that at the time she thought the yearbook did an incredible job of covering everything in the school but she now realizes it did a terrible job because there were so many kids doing so many things that the yearbook never even mentioned. And you know where a lot of us learned about a lot of this stuff? On this message board on this website. And this website was set up for the 50th reunion. So not only did we not know a lot of our classmates very well when we were in school, but we still didn't know them very well 20, 30 and 40 years later. It's only NOW that we know all this. No wonder some of them feel unappreciated.
  4.  
    I don't deny what you're saying. But there's another side to this. Life is hard. It's not fair. And it's particularly hard growing up. You don't make the grade you wanted, you don't get in the club you wanted, you don't make the team, or you do make the team but the team isn't successful, you can't talk any of the girls (or guys) you want into going out with you, and so on. It's not like the teacher or the coach or the girls or the kids in the club are out to get you. Sometimes it's you. You didn't study hard enough, you weren't good enough, you didn't try hard enough, you were immature, whatever. We all go through those disappointments. But it wasn't the school that did that to you, and it wasn't your classmates who did it to you. It was you who did it to you. So you just need to learn from it and try harder next time. You can't spend your life thinking the kids you knew when you were 15 years old didn't like you. Anyway, even if they didn't like you, it's been 50 years. Maybe now they'll like you. So people ought to come to the reunion and meet everybody again for the new first time.
    • CommentAuthorLurk
    • CommentTimeMay 8th 2016
     
    You might even find out some of the people liked you more than you thought. 50 years after graduation, I had two girls tell me they had huge crushes on me all through high school but were too shy to tell me. Geez! Would knowing THAT have changed my whole life! Or at least the high school part of it.
    • CommentAuthorNatalie
    • CommentTimeMay 8th 2016 edited
     
    But people are weird, too. The same people can have the exact same experience and see it totally differently. I've also tried to talk some of our classmates into coming to our reunions. With no luck. But here's the thing : They DID achieve a whole lot in school. They made good grades, won some awards, were well liked by everybody, were respected by their teachers. God knows they did better than I did. And I talk to them, and they say, "Well, I'm embarrassed I didn't accomplish anything in high school, I wasn't important. I feel like I was just sort of there. So I'd feel awkward coming back to a reunion." WHAT? Good God. They were in the honor society. Guys thought they were gorgeous. Girls were jealous of them. Now, to be fair, after several years, I did manage to talk a couple of them into coming to a reunion, and they had a great time and afterward thanked me for talking them into it. But those other few never have come to one. I am just amazed at how inaccurate some people's impressions of themselves is. Like the cute girl who looks in a mirror and doesn't think she's attractive. How do people get that negative perception?
  5.  
    I agree with everybody. Some of our classmates have a skewed view and it's hard changing their mind. I had this one girl I tried for several years to talk into coming back to a reunion. She finally told me, "Look. I understand you and all those people have all your wonderful memories of growing up in Coraopolis. But now listen to me : I don't. I was miserable. I was so lonely I could die. I couldn't wait to get out of there and once I did, the only reason I went back was because I still had family there. I don't anymore, so I have no reason to go back." Well, here's the thing. This girl was adorable. I know two guys who dated her in high school and they both thought she was gorgeous. They were in love with her and would have done anything for her. And she was "so lonely she could die" ? What more did she need? She made A's in the top classes, everyone I knew liked her, she was in several clubs, the whole package. How in the world do some of our classmates develop such negative memories? I feel so bad for them. But no amount of telling them how well loved and appreciated they were can overcome this negative image they've built up over time. I think we have to keep trying. Every reunion we have to call or email or whatever and try once again to convince them to come back.
    • CommentAuthorBelAir
    • CommentTimeMay 8th 2016
     
    We'll be there. I had a wonderful time growing up in Coraopolis and wish I could go back and do it again, although I'd do a few things differently. I think there are always a small group of people who see everything through a negative filter. The other day I watched a guy hold a door open for some lady with her hands full, and she asked him if that made him feel superior, did he think women couldn't open their own doors? He just shrugged his shoulders and walked away. The only thing I feel bad about is that so many of us live so far away and it's expensive and time consuming to come back every few years. In some fantasy world it would be nice if we all stayed in town all our lives so we could all visit each other at holidays and see each other downtown and stay friends our whole lives. Yes, I know, that's a fantasy, but let me tell you some of the friends I made growing up in Coraopolis were and still are some of the best friends I ever made. they were great kids and grew up into great adults. I love every reunion and if my health ever deteriorates to the point I can't attend them anymore it will break my heart.
    • CommentAuthorPonytail
    • CommentTimeMay 25th 2016
     
    Over the years I've developed a theory about this. About people who seem to have negative memories of what was a positive time in their lives. I've known several of these people, some from Cory and some from college, and they seem to fit the same pattern perfectly. At some point in their lives, usually in their 20s but sometimes a little later, they experience a real traumatic experience. It usually involves a nasty divorce. And it sours their view of everything that ever happened to them. So even though other things that they experienced were great, the black cloud of that divorce or whatever spreads over it and they start seeing everything as hostile, evil, ugly, cold or whatever. I had a few friends from college who are like this. They claim it was awful. It was not awful. They were good students, were in sororities, were popular, and had a great time. But both of them married guys they met in college. One of them caught their hubby cheating on them, and the other one's hubby left her for his secretary. So since they met their husbands in college, college gets lumped in with their disgusting husbands and they don't want to even think about either one. I'm not saying everyone suffered through the divorce issue. We have classmates who got divorced and still come to renions. I'm just saying some kind of bad experience can distort your memories of what were originally good times.
    • CommentAuthorCorey
    • CommentTimeMay 25th 2016
     
    The Committee asks me to remind everyone that you need to send your confirmation and checks to Margie by June 1. She still has some people who say they're coming but haven't sent their registration in yet. Also, a few people are having trouble signing in to the website message board. It gives them a "cannot find the server" box. If this happens to you, just hit the return arrow, which gives you the original sign in box, and try a second time. It always works the second time. There's some glitch which only shows up on some computers but not all. We're trying to solve the problem.
    • CommentAuthorDuckpin
    • CommentTimeMay 25th 2016
     
    Planning on making it. I've loved every one. I really envy those people i talk to whose elementary, junior high and high schools are still operating, and when they go back for reunions they schedule walk throughs. It would be neat to walk through our old buildings. I regret that we let them tear those buildings down or convert them beyond recognition. I have one friend and they always have their dinner catered in their gym since they didn't have a cafeteria.
    • CommentAuthorynottony
    • CommentTimeMay 25th 2016
     
    I will be there, Will be glad to see Jim Viccaro after all these years
    • CommentAuthorDuckpin
    • CommentTimeJul 13th 2016
     
    Finally back home, unpacked and rested from the trip. Enjoyed the reunion. Thought Jimmy and Ronnie were the highlights. Both facilities were nice, and the shuttle to Robert Morris was certainly helpful. This was a smaller group but in a way that was an advantage because it let each of us spend more time with each classmate.
    • CommentAuthorBelAir
    • CommentTimeJul 14th 2016
     
    We enjoyed it, too. I was glad to see Lucy was there and I thought she did pretty well. I wish we could have one every year but of course I know out of towners can't clear their schedules and spend all that money that often. I appreciate all the work the committee must put in to get one of these organized.
  6.  
    I liked meeting Jimmy after all these years. I had an embarrassing moment when we first arrived. Danny met me at the door, gave me a big hug and we talked for several minutes. He introduced me to Jimmy. Nobody was wearing name tags and I had no idea who Danny was. After we got to our table, I asked someone and they told me that was Danny. I can't believe how tall he is and how young he looks. The rest of us must be shrinking. I sure don't remember him being that much taller than everybody else. We thought the food was really good Saturday night. I wish more Lincoln School kids would show up. This year, only Margie, Carolyn, David and Danny were there from the old Lincoln bunch. I'd like to talk to Marilyn, Carol Ann, Mary Kay, Jean and the others. We had a conflict and had to miss the last one when Kenny was there and I hated missing him. I wish Dale and Bonnie would come to at least one. We're already looking forward to the next one.
    • CommentAuthorSchwinn
    • CommentTimeJul 15th 2016
     
    Always enjoy coming "home" for these reunions. I continue to be disappointed with the decline of Coraopolis, but it's the same story with all these rust belt communities. However, I am always impressed with how professional my classmates are. In my career, I've met with several thousand clients and colleagues and I've learned you can tell a lot about someone in just a few minutes of conversation. These guys I went to school with, Ronnie, both Bills, Louie, Angelo, Danny, Dave, Anthony and Jimmy, are so smooth, articulate, mature, intelligent, and informed that it's no wonder they've all done so well in their various career fields. Like everyone else, I wish we had had a larger turnout, but given the number of classmates we've lost in the last few years, the number with health issues, and the ones living far away, I can see how our numbers are down. As has been said, kudos to the committee for the hard work that went into this. Looking forward to the next one.
    • CommentAuthorFLU
    • CommentTimeAug 1st 2016
     
    OK guys, I was visiting from Louisiana this past week and while out in the woods I came across some trees with some names carved into them. I took photos but I'm not sure who to email them to or how to post them? These trees were located by the creek that ran all the way past Wildcat Rock up towards the Pleasant View area
    • CommentAuthorCorey
    • CommentTimeAug 10th 2016
     
    FLU : Email them to Omlordw@aol.com. He'll either recognize them or can hike out and check them out.
    • CommentAuthorDago
    • CommentTimeApr 9th 2017
     
    Haven't been on for a while. Doesn't look like anybody else has been, either. But I dropped by to see if anyone else was reading The Record since Danny recreated it. I was a little skeptical he could pull it off, but a lot of people have mentioned it to me in the last few months, so obviously lots of people in Cory and Moon are reading it. Amazing. We have our town newspaper back.
    • CommentAuthorynottony
    • CommentTimeJul 14th 2018 edited
     
    I hope we have a nice turn out for the 60 year reunion.